Content Writer, OceanHub
8 Mar 2018 10:11 (GMT+1)

Sowing The Seeds For A Sustainable Ocean Space

The OceanHub Interview With Marine Engineer and Educator Bharat Hora

The Maritime executive and nautical instructor empowers the next generation of ocean engineers to take responsiblity to ensure a sustainable future for their profession and for the environment

"Will we still have a job?"


It is a question that Bharat Hora gets asked all the time. Considering the pace of innovation in the Ocean Space, it is a hot topic at the Nautical Institute in Nova Scotia, Canada, where he teaches marine engineering, naval architecture, and leadership courses.


Bharat assures students that the important Maritime skills they are learning will continue to be in demand, even as the job market in the ocean industries evolves. He tells them to be prepared to adapt their new skills to accomodate rapid changes.


But Bharat also challenges his students to look at the bigger picture. As entire industries continue to clean up messes from the past, Bharat encourages the young engineer cadets to create the conditions that will sustain not just a healthy job market - but also a clean ocean. 


"The Ocean Space and its resources have been used irresponsibly in the past by humankind, but now we are slowly realizing this and are trying to correct those mistakes," he said. "More regulations, stricter enforcement and lower tolerance of things that were an acceptable norm not long ago, are in today.


"As future marine engineers, however unfair it may sound, the responsibility of bringing about such changes ultimately will lie on their young shoulders when they join the workforce as marine engineers."


Originally from India, Bharat has broad experience in marine shipboard engineering, shipbuilding, and procurement for ships under construction and in service. In addition to his roles in maritime education, Bharat is also skilled in the technical management of ships and regulations. His Articles on OceanHub cover multiple subjects related to the ocean communities, such as a series about the best practices in marine procurement. He also plans to write more Articles on trends and new technology that pertain to marine sustainabillity.


"These are very exciting times that we are going through with a lot of innovation and change happening around us in the industry," he said. "And communities like OceanHub will ensure that we stay in touch with these happenings around us."


As an OceanHub InfluencerBharat writes about multiple subjects related to the Ocean Space, such as shipboard engineering, maritime education, and ship management. Bharat said he values the OceanHub community, where he hopes to not just educate others, but to "stay up with the latest trends and regulations in maritime shipping and offshore industries about which I am extremely passionate about."


Bharat is on OceanHub to share knowledge, gain knowledge and make a positive impact by influencing Ocean Space sustainability. 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              


About Bharat Hora He earned his bachelor's degree in Marine Engineering from the Directorate of Marine of Engineering Training (DMET) program in India. Bharat has served in several roles in his Maritime career, including global procurement manager and vessel auditor. Today, Bharat teaches Marine Engineering and Advance Diploma students at the NSCC Nautical Institue and also runs his own marine consultancy.


Read Bharat's latest OceanHub Articles on his Profile and learn more details from his answers to our questions below.


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What Do You Tell Your Students About The Current State Of The Ocean Space?

I tell the cadets that things are not the same as they were during the time that I was sailing. The Ocean Space and its resources have been used irresponsibly in the past by humankind, but now we are slowly realizing this and are trying to correct those mistakes. More regulations, stricter enforcement and lower tolerance of things that were an acceptable norm not long ago, are in today. As future marine engineers, however unfair it may sound, the responsibility of bringing about such changes ultimately will lie on their young shoulders when they join the workforce as marine engineers. One common question that I get from the cadets is whether they will still have a job in a few years’ time, considering the pace at which automation is taking over and fully automated, driverless vessels are a reality. My answer is that even if this does happen in the near future, there will be many shore side jobs added where their skills will be required. For this, your skills will need to be more adaptable in order for you to stay relevant.


What Is Your Advice For Those Entering The Industry?

Good soft skills, social skills, situational awareness, technical competence and the mindset of being a responsible leader in whatever one attempts should take them far in their chosen career. Being only technically competent at one’s jobs is not going to be enough in today’s ever-changing climate. One will have to be flexible and keep updating skills. Staying on top of all the regulations and innovations happening in one’s field of expertise is becoming increasingly important. Embracing the changing technology is the key today, and this needs to be clear to everyone.

Where Do You See The Biggest Opportunities?

Today’s opportunities are ever changing. Today, humankind has realized that one cannot just keep taking from the Ocean Space, leaving it behind in ruins. Regulations are ever changing to this effect, and this has brought (or is bringing in) sustainable energy and new technology in a big way to the shipping and offshore industries. Responsible regulators, ship owners and ocean harvesters are key to this. The rogues are (hopefully) in the process of being weeded out.


What Topics Do You Write About On OceanHub?

I am blogging for multiple subjects related to ocean community, especially related to shipboard engineering, maritime education, ship management and related subjects. All these topics are relevant to anyone whose work relates to the ocean as ships are the main means for the transportation of goods across the world.


What Are Your Goals For Your Articles?

I hope to get educated from and educate the OceanHub community so as to stay with the latest trends and regulations in maritime shipping and offshore industries about which I am extremely passionate about. Also, these are very exciting times that we are going through with a lot of innovation and change happening around us in the industry, and communities like OceanHub will ensure that we stay in touch with these happenings around us.


There is definitely a need to have community platforms like OceanHub to ensure that all of us connected within the Ocean Space stay in touch with the changes that are happening around us at such a fast pace. Everything is changing, and if we do not keep up with what is happening in our space, then there is likelihood that we will be left behind and become redundant. Knowledge sharing communities like OceanHub will hopefully ensure that this does not happen and the transition is painless!


What is Your Professional Background?

My area of knowledge, expertise and experience is quite broad. The following areas can be considered as my expertise - marine shipboard engineering, shipbuilding, procurement for ships under construction and ships in service, maritime education, technical management of ships, regulations. I am a marine engineering graduate with a chief engineer’s certification. I have sailed as a chief engineer for about three years, have worked in an Indian shipyard as a general manager for new construction, which included being in-charge of building ships for a Norwegian company called Lys-Line. I also worked as the procurement manager for Wilhelmsen Ship Management where I was instrumental in helping to centralize the entire procurement department to work from one location. I have since worked as a general manger for a ship services company in Singapore, and have also worked in Australia and the US for brief periods. I am presently self-employed as a course director for Lloyd’s Maritime Academy for their ship superintendent’s course and marine purchasing and supply chain course. I have also done new building consultancy for multiple projects, and worked as an environmental auditor for US Coast Guard through a US based maritime company. In addition, I am also working as a faculty member for a nautical institute in Nova Scotia, teaching marine engineering cadets. I teach Marine Engineering Diploma and Advance Diploma students - Marine Engineering Knowledge, Naval Architecture, Leadership and Management, and Leadership and Teamwork courses.


What Has Your International Work Experience Taught You About The Ocean Space?

The Ocean Space is everywhere and is key to sustained development of any country or region even (or specially) in today’s times of global supply chains. The requirements are the same wherever you go. The Ocean Space will continue to be used for transportation and its resources will be mined in the coming future also. However, the wave of responsibly doing this is washing ashore everywhere now, whether it be Australia, Canada, Singapore, USA or India. Some countries may be leaders in it and the other followers. But what I am happy to note is that a new realization has dawned in us as world citizens and we are working together towards a better, cleaner and more eco-friendly future in the Ocean Space.

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